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The 2022 NBA Finals matchup has been established thanks to Boston's Game 7 victory against Miami.

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The No. 2 seed in the East, the Celtics, will face the No. 3 seed in the West, the Warriors.

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The first game is scheduled for Thursday in San Francisco. The Warriors are the favourites (-155 to +135), but I'll take the Celtics in seven games.

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I believe they can compete with Golden State. Here are three strategies for the Celtics to win in 2022.

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1. Celtics switching vs. Warriors movement

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The Celtics' defence can handle Golden State's off-ball movement. Boston screens and misdirects Klay Thompson, Stephen Curry, and Jordan Poole.

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The Warriors don't care about matchups, which is fine because Boston's defence is solid (you could argue, maybe, Grant Williams in space).

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Warriors half-court looks will be few. Marcus Smart, Jayson Tatum, Derrick White, and Jaylen Brown can all guard Curry one-on-one, while Al Horford is good on the perimeter.

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Boston's rebounding may make Golden State's possessions last longer than they like, giving Boston the advantage.

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Golden State's turnovers are problematic. Boston will press. Switch, double, and recover.

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They're like Miami. Will Warriors have enough shooting space? Spontaneously. Boston's defence worries Golden State long-term.

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2. Open season on Steph Because the Celtics have no weak link, the Warriors will target Curry and Poole.

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Boston scouted Miami well. When Luka Doncic repeatedly attacked Curry with pick and rolls, Golden State handled it brilliantly.

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They didn't want to switch Curry onto Doncic, just as they won't want to leave him to guard Tatum or Brown in the Finals

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but they had Curry show/hedge on Doncic before running back to his assignment.

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Delicate moments of recuperation. Due to Boston's hedging and wing reinforcements, shooters and secondary playmakers will have more opportunities.

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Despite Brown's inconsistent dribbling, Brunson is not Brown. Smart, White, and the rest of the squad can dribble off leverage. Boston can score when focused.

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The Warriors, who don't double team, will have trouble forcing Curry and/or Poole to guard straight up if Tatum and Brown can set up teammates for clean shots. 

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Boston's defensive pressure spots are much less (I would argue none).

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3. Size matters In the postseason, the Warriors have outrebounded the Celtics.

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The Warriors faced a small Dallas team and a Memphis team sans Steven Adams (when Adams did play, he hurt them on the glass during his minutes with 12 offensive rebounds over Games 4 and 5 ).

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Golden State has gotten tremendous play from Kevon Looney (who turned the script on Adams in Game 6 with 22 boards, 11 offensive to just one for Adams) but will go small with Draymond Green at the five.

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Nobody on the Celtics hunts offensive rebounds like Adams, but if Looney plays a lot to stop Boston, it will limit Golden State's offence.

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 In a seven-game series, how long can Looney battle Horford and the Williams'? Horford will force Looney out of single-big lineups.

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Draymond Green will struggle, but Andrew Wiggins (and Curry) are good positional rebounders.

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The Warriors can contend or win the rebounding war (offensive rebounding has never been harder to forecast with all the long rebounds off 3-point shots).

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Boston can win the rebounding battle and transition to Golden State's shooters on paper. 

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Over a series, Boston's perimeter size and second-chance possibilities develop.

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